Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center

Apple IPM Transition Project

Survey Results

2009 Field Season Consultant Survey

The 2009 Field Season Consultant Survey was mailed out in January 2010. The results of that survey are now available for viewing online here or you can download the written report. The results of this survey will be compared to the 2007 Field Season Consultant Survey and compiled. A report of compariative findings will be posted when complete.

2009 Consultant Survey Results
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B1: How frequently does codling moth cause unacceptable crop damage in the apple orchard(s) for which you make recommendations?

 

  Frequency Percent
Never 5 4.4
Less than 1 out of every 5 years 32 28.1
About 1 out of every 5 years 27 23.7
About 2 out of every 5 years 11 9.6
About 3 out of every 5 years 12 10.5
About 4 out of every 5 years 6 5.3
Every year 21 18.4
Total 114 100.0
Missing = 6
B1
 
B2: If no controls were applied for codling moth this year, what level of crop injury would you expect by harvest?

 

  Frequency Percent
Less than 1% 2 1.7
1-2% 6 5.1
3-5% 15 12.8
6-10% 16 13.7
More than 10% 78 66.7
Total 117 100.0
Missing = 3
B2
 
B3a: During the 2009 growing season, did you recommend any of the following OP insecticides as a control for codling moth?

 

  Frequency Percent
Guthion (azinphos methyl) 97 82.9
Imidan (phosmet) 36 30.8
Diazinon 9 7.7
Missing =3
B3
 
B3b: If you recommended the following OP insecticides as a control for codling moth, please indicate the number of applications you recommended in 2009 (frequency, with percent in parentheses).

 

Number of applications
Guthion
Imidan
Diazinon
1 application
14 (14.4%)
20 (55.6%)
9 (100%)
2 applications
59 (60.8%)
12 (33.3%)
0 (0%)
3 applications
22 (22.7%)
3 (8.3%)
0 (0%)
4+ applications
2 (2.1%)
1 (2.8%)
0 (0%)
Total
97 (100%)
36 (100%)
9 (100%)
skipped
0
0
0
N/A
23
84
111
B3b
 
B4: Did your recommendations of OP insecticides (Guthion, Diazinon, and Imidan) for codling moth control decrease, remain about the same, or increase over the past three years (2007–2009)?


  Frequency Percent
My recommendation of OPs for codling moth decreased the past three years 87 74.4
My recommendation of OPs for codling moth control remained about the same 25 21.4
My recommendation of OPs for codling moth increased the past three years 1 0.8
I did not recommend OP insecticides in 2007–2009 4 3.4
Total 117 100.0
Missing = 3
B4
 
B5a: During the 2009 growing season, did you recommend this insecticide as a control for codling moth?

 

Insecticide Frequency Percent
Pheromones (mating disruption) 115 98.3
Delegate (spinetoram) 97 82.9
Altacor (rynaxypyr) 94 80.3
Horticultural spray oil 90 76.9
Assail (acetaminprid) 86 73.5
Intrepid (methoxyfenozide) 63 53.8
Rimon (novaluron) 54 46.2
CM granulosis virus 51 43.6
Entrust/Success (spinosad) 44 37.6
Calypso (thiacloprid) 43 36.8
Esteem (pyrifoxen) 38 32.5
Warrior (lambda-cyhalothrin) 34 29.1
Belt (flubendiamide) 5 4.3
Danitol (fenpropathrin) 3 2.6
Voliam Flexi 0 0.0
Voliam Express 0 0.0
Other (Agri-Mek) 1 0.9
Missing = 3
B5a
 
B5b: If you recommended the following OP alternatives as a control for codling moth, please indicate the number of applications you recommended for a typical orchard in 2009 (frequency, with percent in parentheses).

 

  Number of applications      
Insecticide 1 2 3 4+ Total Skipped N/A
Pheromones (mating disruption)
104 (91.2%)
5 (4.4%)
1 (0.9%)
4 (3.5%)
114 (100%)
1 5
Delegate (spinetoram)
39 (41.5%)
49 (52.1%)
5 (5.3%)
1 (1.1%)
94 (100%)
3 23
Altacor (rynaxypyr)
40 (44.0%)
47 (51.6%)
2 (2.2%)
2 (2.2%)
91 (100%)
3 26
Horticultural spray oil
30 (34.1%)
43 (48.9%)
15 (17.0%)
0 (0%)
88 (100%)
2 30
Assail (acetaminprid)
53 (64.6%)
24 (29.3%)
2 (2.4%)
3 (3.7%)
82 (100%)
4 34
Intrepid (methoxyfenozide)
50 (83.3%)
7 (11.7%)
2 (3.3%)
1 (1.7%)
60 (100%)
3 57
Rimon (novaluron)
40 (75.5%)
10 (18.8%)
1 (1.9%)
2 (3.8%)
53 (100%)
1 66
CM granulosis virus
21 (44.7%)
15 (31.9%)
8 (17.0%)
3 (6.4%)
47 (100%)
4 69
Entrust/Success (spinosad)
22 (53.7%)
14 (34.1%)
4 (9.8%)
1 (2.4%)
41 (100%)
3 75
Calypso (thiacloprid)
33 (84.6%)
5 (12.8%)
0 (0%)
1 (2.6%)
39 (100%)
4 77
Esteem (pyrifoxen)
28 (80.0%)
4 (11.4%)
1 (2.9%)
2 (5.7%)
35 (100%)
3 82
Warrior (lambda-cyhalothrin)
24 (72.7%)
8 (24.3%)
1 (3.0%)
0 (0%)
33 (100%)
1 86
Belt (flubendiamide)
5 (100.0%)
0 (0%)
0 (0%)
0 (0%)
5 (100%)
0 115
Danitol (fenpropathrin)
2 (66.7%)
1 (33.3%)
0 (0%)
0 (0%)
3 (100%)
0 117
Voliam Flexi
0 (0%)
0 (0%)
0 (0%)
0 (0%)
0 (0%)
0 120
Voliam Express
0 (0%)
0 (0%)
0 (0%)
0 (0%)
0 (0%)
0 120
Other (Agri-Mek)
0 (0%)
0 (0%)
0 (0%)
0 (0%)
0 (0%)
1 119
B5b1 B5b2
 
B6: Did your recommendations of OP alternatives (listed in Question B5) for codling moth control decrease, remain about the same, or increase over the past three years (2007–2009)?

 

 
Frequency
Percent
My recommendation of OP alternatives for codling moth control decreased over the past three years.
9
7.8
My recommendation of OP alternatives for codling moth control remained about the same over the past three years.
19
16.5
My recommendation of OP alternatives for codling moth control increased over the past three years.
87
75.7
I did not recommend OP alternatives for codling moth control in 2007–2009
0
0
Total
115
100.0
Missing = 5
B6
 
B7: Over the past three years did codling moth injury in the apple orchards for which you make recommendations decrease, remain about the same, or increase?

 

  Frequency Percent
Codling moth injury decreased by more than 5% 13 10.8
Codling moth injury decreased by 2–5% 8 6.7
Codling moth injury remained about the same (± 0–2%) 81 67.5
Codling moth injury increased by 2–5% 16 13.3
Codling moth injury increased by more than 5% 2 1.7
Total 120 100.0
Missing = 0
 
B8: Over the past three years did the cost of codling moth control in the apple orchards for which you make recommendations decrease, or remain about the same, or increase?

 

  Frequency Percent
The cost of codling moth control decreased by more than 10% 2 1.7
The cost of codling moth control decreased by 3–10% 1 0.8
The cost of codling moth control remained about the same (± 0–3%) 13 10.9
The cost of codling moth control increased by 3–10% 57 47.9
The cost of codling moth control increased by more than 10% 46 38.7
Total 119 100.0
Missing = 1
 
B9: How many pheromone traps did you use or recommend per acre in a typical orchard during the 2009 growing season?

 

Number of traps Frequency Percent
1 trap per 2.5 acres or less 8 6.7
1 trap per 2.6–5 acres 47 39.2
1 trap per 5.1–10 acres 54 45.0
1 trap per 10.1 acres or more 10 8.3
I did not use (recommend) pheromone traps during the 2009 growing season. 1 0.8
Total 120 100.0
Missing = 0
B9
 
B10: How often did you recommend the following IPM practices as part of your consulting program for codling moth? (frequency, with percent in parentheses).
 
IPM tactic
Never
Rarely
Occasionally
Often
Missing
Field monitoring for damage
0 (0%)
0 (0%)
8 (6.7%)
112 (93.3%)
0
Pheromone traps
1 (0.8%)
2 (1.7%)
6 (5.0%)
111 (92.5%)
0
Degree day models
0 (0%)
0 (0%)
12 (10.0%)
108 (90.0%)
0
Resistance management strategies
2 (1.7%)
1 (0.8%)
18 (15.0%)
99 (82.5%)
0
Economic or treatment thresholds
8 (6.7%)
11 (9.2%)
31 (26.1%)
69 (58.0%)
1
Border sprays
5 (4.2%)
12 (10.1%)
48 (40.3%)
54 (45.4%)
1
Delayed distribution of bins in orchard
24 (20.2%)
19 (15.9%)
39 (32.8%)
37 (31.1%)
1
Biological controls (parasites or predators)
57 (48.3%)
24 (20.3%)
21 (17.8%)
16 (13.6%)
2
Reduced pesticide rates
48 (40.0%)
34 (28.3%)
30 (25.0%)
8 (6.7%)
0
Alternate row spraying
57 (47.5%)
35 (29.2%)
23 (19.2%)
5 (4.2%)
0
Other *
2 (25.0%)
1 (12.5%)
2 (25.0%)
3 (37.5%)
112
* Bin pile treatments; mating disruption; coverage; speed; gallonage; suckering; pruning

 

B10

 
B11: Did your recommendations of the IPM practices (listed in Question B10) as a control for codling moth decrease, remain about the same, or increase over the past three years (2007–2009)?

 

IPM tactic
Did not use
Decreased
Remained
the Same
Increased
Missing
Resistance management strategies
2 (1.7%)
0 (0.0%)
43 (36.4%)
73 (61.9%)
2
Pheromone traps
1 (0.8%)
0 (0.0%)
67 (55.8%)
52 (43.4%)
0
Field monitoring for damage
0 (0.0%)
0 (0.0%)
71 (59.2%)
49 40.8%)
0
Border sprays 
6 (5.0%)
4 (3.4%)
64 (53.8%)
45 (37.8%)
1
Degree day models
0 (0.0%)
0 (0.0%)
72 (60.0%)
45 (37.5%)
0
Delayed distribution of bins in orchard
23 (19.3%)
1 (0.9%)
67 (56.3%)
28 (23.5%)
1
Economic or treatment thresholds
9 (7.5%)
2 (1.7%)
81 (68.1%)
27 (22.7%)
1
Biological controls (parasites or predators)
46 (39.0%)
0 (0.0%)
53 (44.9%)
19 (16.1%)
2
Alternate row spraying
43 (35.8%)
13 (10.8%)
57 (47.5%)
8 (6.7%)
0
Reduced pesticide rates
43 (35.8%)
10 (8.4%)
61 (50.8%)
6 (5.0%)
0
Other *
5 (50.0%)
0 (0.0%)
2 (20.0%)
3 (30.0%)
110
* Increased mating disruption; increased coverage

 

B11

 
B12: What percentage of the apple acres for which you make recommendations do your answers to Questions B1 through B11 (questions about codling moth) apply to?

 

 
Frequency
Percent
1-10%
1
0.8
11-25%
5
4.2
26-50%
2
1.7
51-75%
19
15.8
76-99%
49
40.8
100%
44
36.7
Total
120
100.0
Missing = 0
B12
 

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