Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center

Apple IPM Transition Project

2008 WSU IPM Fruit School

Pest Management:

Growers and Advisors Working Together to Optimize Resources

WSU Tree Fruit Extension and PMTP teamed up to present a 2-day fruit school focusing on the systems approach to improve orchard management through better utilization of the available resources. Day 1 began with Session 1: "The Fundamentals" of an effective pest management system. The remainder of the day was spent on the specifics of getting good insect and disease control in Session 2: "Achieving and Improving Control". Day 2 began with Session 3: "Marketing and Regulations", which focused on marketing issues impacting a pest management program. Day 2 continued with Session 4: "Building Capacity for a better IPM program" which factored in human and material requirements needed to build a successful program.
This Fruit School is dedicated the memory of our friend and colleague Naná Simone who past away in an accident during the planning phase of this course, Naná worked relentlessly for the past two decades to improve our understanding and use of Integrated Pest Management and was a strong advocate of Hispanic tree fruit worker education.

A proceedings DVD mailed out Summer 2009 to all paid workshop attendees. We will be using the address that was given to us at the time of your Fruit School registration. If this address is not correct or you aren't sure what address was given and you have not received your DVD, please contact us at: pmtp.info@wsu.edu or 509-883-8181 (ask for a PMTP staff person).
For people that did not attend the school DVDs are available to order online through the WSU extension publications office.

Course Outline with video links

(click on each session's panel to view or hide contents - Please allow pop-ups for this site so you can view videos)
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Session 1: The Fundamentals (Day 1)

Session Chair: Jay Brunner
Session Goal: Tree fruit pest control is changing due to a range of factors, regulations, new pesticides, export barriers, and consumer expectations. This session will explain these changes, present a holistic view of pest management and introduce fundamental concept of planning, sampling and monitoring, which will form the basis for future sessions.

Course Introduction & Pre-evaluation of IPM Knowledge- Jay Brunner  Watch video

Objectives: To assess participants level of knowledge regarding the current phase-out of AZM, newer pest management practices and new pesticides. Using the Turning Point live testing technology, the class participants got the chance to answer questions anonymously to gauge what they knew coming in to the course. At the end of Day 2, participants were asked the same questions again. This allowed the session speakers to determine if their material was presented in a manner that could be easily understood and retained.

Fruit School Memorial Dedication to Naná Simone
Why is Pest Management Changing? - Jay Brunner  Watch video

Objectives: Tree fruit pest control is changing due to a range of factors, regulations, new pesticides, export barriers, and consumer expectations. This will explain these changes, present a holistic view of pest management and introduce fundamental concept of planning, sampling and monitoring, which will form the basis for future sessions.

Fundamentals of a well designed IPM system – MIke Doerr  Watch video

Objectives: Pest management programs include more than what goes into the sprayer tank. This presentation will demonstrate how holistic planning of an entire orchard operation impacts the success of a pest management program.

Fundamentals of sampling – Jay Brunner  Watch video

Objectives: Monitoring is a core component of a good pest management program. This presentation will focus on the basics of sampling/monitoring is easy to understand language and examples. By understanding the value and limitations of sampling better monitoring programs can be implemented leading to better pest control decisions.

TEAM example – Norman Suverly  Watch video

Objectives: Using the Technology Economic Assessment Model (TEAM), a new program available to growers, this talk will show the economic impact of some of the topics discussed in this session. Scenarios may include, but are not limited to examining the cost of taking a control action when you didn't’t need to, the cost of not taking a control action when you needed to, and the benefit of taking a control action when justified.

 

Session 2: Achieving & Improving Control (Day 1)

Session Chair: Keith Granger
Session Goal: This session will take conceptual pest management to the next step, working with participants to develop the skills necessary to implement a site-specific pest management system. Topics of discussion in this session will include using degree day models and the WSU Decision Aid System to make better management decisions, new pesticides that are available and how and when to use them in a pest management program, how to improve sprayer coverage, and how to develop and implement a site-specific pest monitoring plan.

Introduction to Achieving and Improving Control – Keith Granger  Watch video

Models and WSU Decision Aid System – Jay Brunner  Watch video

Objectives: Using degree-day models to predict important biological events that are difficult to observe in the orchard is a key element of a good pest management program. How and why degree-day models work and how the WSU Decision Aid System (DAS) integrates degree-day models and site-specific weather information with management recommendations will be explained in this presentation. How to use the DAS to make better management decisions such as optimizing the timing of pesticide applications and pest-monitoring activities will also be demonstrated.

Integrating new insecticides into an IPM plan: the insects – Keith Granger  Watch video

Objectives: Many new op-alternative insecticides have been registered for control of key pests in apple. Using these new products successfully requires more than simply substituting a new pesticide for an old one. Strategies that optimize the use of these products by targeting specific life stages, improving application timing, and avoiding the development of insecticide resistance will be discussed.

Integrating new fungicides into a pest management program – Chang-Lin Xiao  Watch video

Objectives: Integration of new fungicides with advances in disease modeling (such as cherry powdery mildew) is crucial for good disease control and to avoid development of resistance. This talk will cover new chemicals and tools available to growers to refine their disease control.

Improving deposition and reducing drift – Andrew Landers  (video no longer available, instead visit here)

Objectives: Thorough spray coverage has been identified as a crucial aspect of using new pesticides successfully. Sprayer equipment, drive speed and sprayer output must be coordinated to ensure proper air displacement in the tree canopy and improve deposition. Yet there is a balance between adequate coverage and reducing drift. This balance will be discussed by one of the nation’s leading engineer on application technology.

Developing a site specific monitoring plan – Astrid Goplen  Watch video

Objectives: Higher costs of new insecticides coupled with increasing fuel and labor prices have made monitoring a more economically appealing pest management tool. It has been demonstrated that a site-specific monitoring program can save money by reducing pesticide use – usually through fewer pesticide applications, while providing better crop protection and reducing crop losses. The principles of a site-specific monitoring plan and strategies to implement this type of plan will be identified and discussed.

Panel Discussion: Experience of good pest control – moderators: Astrid Goplen & Keith Granger  Watch video

Objectives: Panelists Travis Schoenwald (Gebbers Farms), Torrey Hansen (Cascade IPM), Marty Robinson (Wilbur-Ellis), Dain Craver (DAC Consulting & Crave Organics) and Dave Gleason (Kershaw Farms) were asked to consider and address the following questions:

  1. Tell us how your orchard operation (or client orchard) as a whole has formed and directed your pest management program.
  2. What information needs to be gathered: crops, pests, infrastructure (irrigation system, etc)?
  3. How do you put together a monitoring plan for pests you know are there and unanticipated pests?
  4. How do you use auxiliary tools like DAS?
  5. How do the principles you try to follow and control tactics you choose operate in the real world?
  6. How do you analyze spray application coverage?
  7. How have the above tools that you’ve adapted to a particular site improved your pest management?
  8. What do you wish could be done better or differently?


TEAM example – Norman Suverly  Watch video

Objectives: Using the Technology Economic Assessment Model (TEAM), a new program available to growers, this talk will show the economic impact of some of the topics discussed in this session. Scenarios may include, but are not limited to the economic impact of better information/monitoring and improved calibration of sprayers.

 

Session 3: Marketing & Regulations (Day 2)

Session Chair: Tim Smith
Session Goal: Regulatory issues have had a significant impact on pest management programs. Understanding the impact of current and future regulatory actions is important when making pest management decisions. Likewise, decisions made in the orchard can affect the way a crop will be marketed. This session will help growers and marketers work together so that pest management decisions made in the orchard do not become marketing problems.

Re-evaluation of IPM Knowledge- Jay Brunner  Watch video

Objectives: Using the Turning Point live testing technology, the class participants were re-tested on their knowledge of newer pest management practices. This allowed the session speakers to determine if their material was presented in a manner that could be easily understood and retained.

Introduction to Marketing & Regulations Session – Tim Smith  Watch video

Regulatory Issues affecting Pest Management – Mike Willett  Watch video
& Panel Discussion: Practices of managing markets & pests

Objective 1: Numerous aspects affect pest management and usually it is the immediate daily operations that influence decisions more. However, growers are also challenged to keep an eye on the larger picture of sales and regulatory issues. This will cover some items that growers need to be consciously thinking of while managing pests.
Objective 2: Panelists Phil Hull (Zirkle Fruit), Dain Craver (DAC consulting & Craver Organics), Dave Martin (Stemilt Growers) and Byron Phillips (Valent USA Corp.) discussed the decision making process, establishing thresholds, difficulties, and goals in managing their pests while considering regulatory issues and intended markets.

Public demand for sustainability in tree fruit production – Nadine Lehrer & Karina Gallardo  Watch video

Objective: In recent years, consumers have begun demanding agricultural products that are not only affordable and of high quality, but that also live up to certain environmental and social standards of production. The rise of organic foods, fair trade foods, local and regional foods, and sustainability certifications are just a few examples of this trend. Growers that can meet these demands often tap into price premiums or marketing tools that can help maintain profit margins while protecting environmental and human health. This session will describe this growing consumer and public demand for environmental values and sustainability in agriculture, and will highlight ways for fruit growers to think about these trends and begin to tap into these new markets.

 

Session 4: Building Capacity for a Better Pest Management Program (Day 2)

Session Chair: Tom Auvil
Session Goal: Proper monitoring and decision making require human and material resources that must be allocated as they would in any other farm practice. This session will include discussions by growers/managers and crop advisors about the resources that will be needed and how the quality of an investment in staff and technology can be improved.

Introduction to session and statement of goals – Tom Auvil  Watch video

Panel Discussion: Business management of pest management – moderator: Tom Auvil  Watch video

Objective: Orchard operations vary and therefore lead to different business models for pest management. We have identified three models commonly used in the industry. While the business plans differ, each was adopted with a deliberate consideration towards an operation’s budget, staffing, supplies, and daily procedures. Panelists Dennis Smith (GS Long) and Travis Schoenwald (Gebbers Fruit) discussed the requirements, benefits, and drawbacks of each model.

Improving the quality of your investment: Staff – Karen Lewis  Watch video

Objective: Labor is the most expensive aspect of any operation. Fostering a positive work environment with learning opportunities has the potential to not only decrease expenses but increase revenue by creating skilled and motivated employees. This talk will discuss the costs of investing in your employees.

Improving the quality of your investment: Sprayer Technology – Andrew Landers (video no longer available, instead visit here)

Objective: As markets, chemicals, and horticultural systems change, so does the need for different application technology. There are numerous standard sprayers on the market, as well as custom machines. Dr. Andrew Landers will discuss how to improve upon existing machines as well as some novel application technologies.

Does your farm need "EQIP"? – Justin Mount  Watch video

Objective: Production and conservation are two components of any agricultural system and each depends upon the other. NRCS has payment incentives to improve productivity, conserve resources plus enhance habitat for beneficial, native wildlife. EQIP is a mechanism for implementing conservation on private working lands plus is voluntary and competitive.

TEAM examples – Norman Suverly  Watch video

Objective: Using the Technology Economic Assessment Model (TEAM), a new program available to growers, this talk will show the economic impact of some of the topics discussed in this session. Scenarios may include, but are not limited to the cost of using low-volume sprayers and the economic impact of increasing costs for monitoring but achieving better control.

Successful Programs and Fruit School Summary – Jay Brunner  Watch video

Objective: In the past two days we have discussed the basics of where we need to be, how pest management is changing and how to plan for proper pest management. While some of the details have changed, there have been several examples of successful pest management programs that incorporate these lessons.

 

 

 

 

WSU-Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center, 1100 N Western Ave., Wenatchee, WA 98801 509-663-8181, Contact Us